The Bronte Plot by Katherine Reay

bronteplot

ISBN-13: 9781401689759 Publisher: Thomas Nelson

The Brontë Plot by Katherine Reay is a tale of time, secrets and birth. The story of two women. One, Lucy Alling, a young successful woman with a love for classic literature. The other, Helen Carmichael, a wealthy elderly woman with a secret she’s kept hidden for far too long. Both desperate to find out who they really are and drawn together by the revealing of a deception.

Lucy, travels through her own personal journey while chaperoning Helen through England. She has defined herself by the romantic notions of her estranged father. The stories she’s lived behind, are in fact prison walls, keeping her from being the honest part of her own self.

The transparency of Helen Carmichael is the pivotal force that takes Lucy Alling from the safe, imaginary world where she’s created the version of who she thinks she is, to the bare naked form of the real Lucy Alling. Though it might cost her everything she’s ever held of value, Lucy can see the damage her falsities have caused. She is left with the choice between healing that only comes from being honest and living out that uprightness in every part of her own life. But she must decide if it’s worth the price she will pay in love, in business and in her future.

Helen Carmichael is the posh, all put-together type of woman. Beneath that carefully designed exterior, her body is betraying her. Time is running out for her to make amends for the things she’s hidden for so long. Lucy’s admission of guilt, gives Helen the platform she needs to take a journey back to right a wrong. It’s through her excursion that she mentors Lucy and both women are able to find strength in the other’s weaknesses.

The Brontë Plot is the first of Katherine Reay’s books that I’ve read. It was interesting and for the classic lover of literature, it boosts opportunities to meld the old with the new.

FAVORITE QUOTES:

“I mean that reading forms your opinions, your worldview, especially childhood reading, and anything that does that has an impact.” Pg. 38

“How much changed in a life, in a person, when one wasn’t paying attention?” Pg. 163

“And just as she’d told James, fiction conveyed change and truth and was loved and digested again and again because it reflected the worst, the best, and all the moments in between of the human experience.” Pg. 267

I received this book from the Fiction Guild in exchange for my honest opinion which I’ve provided here.

 

 

Advertisements